In today's episode, the team sets about discussing their favourite single malt scotches and whiskeys, well, not really. We consume some fine single-malt during our lively discussion about developing tanks and different systems for home processing, from the simple to the complex, steel, plastic, and constant rotation. In today's episode, we discuss the Hewes branded Steel reels and tanks, Paterson Super System 3 and 4, AP Processing Tanks, JOBO, AuRA and B's Processor.

We're going back to the Mystery Camera Challenge, only this time Alex is picking out cameras for the team from his collection and choosing cameras that will certainly challenge the folks who are used to certain types and styles of cameras. At the same time, Alex takes on a camera from John's collection. The team also discusses tips and techniques for photographing the fall colours that will be coming sooner rather than later.

Cameras Featured

Minolta Weathermatic 35DL, Holga 120N, Agfa Isoly Jr, Graflex Century 35

Falling for Fall

While it's only the first week of September, now is the time to prepare for those fall colours in the next couple of months. You're going to start to see the sun going down earlier, making it easier for those beautiful golden hours which light up the colours of the leaves. As for the film, you will want to choose ones with a warm colour palette; for the slide film, that is Fujifilm Provia 100F; if you want something in C-41, Kodak Gold 200 or Ultramax 400 are excellent choices. Kodak Ektachrome E100 is a good choice if you want to cool things down. If you are a sucker for intense saturation, try Fujifilm Velvia 50 and Kodak Ektar 100. Or even give the new CineStill 400D a try; that will make the reds pop and glow! When you're out, try to meter and shoot for highlights, this will help get those colours to pop and try and aim for good side light; early evening and mid-mornings are your friends at this time of year. Don't procrastinate; get out if you see that things are exactly how you want them; a delay could mean the difference between colour and nothing. And, of course, keep an eye out for those colour forecasts; they will help you plan your timeline.

While Film Photography has been around for a while, some recent developments have occurred within the hobby and community. So in today's episode, Alex, James, John, and Bill sit down to discuss the recently B&W developers they've been using and the newest photo-sharing site, Grainery!

Developers Featured

SPUR HRX

510-Pyro

Flic Film Black/White & Green

Grainery

Bill Smith - https://grainery.app/u/wbsmith200
Alex Luyckx - https://grainery.app/u/alexluyckxphoto
John Meadows - https://grainery.app/u/johnmeadows
James Lee - https://grainery.app/u/jamesleephoto

While we might be heading into the last days of Summer, that doesn't mean we can't look back and look forward to next year with the team's favourite choices for film stocks during the hot and humid days of Canadian Summer. So join Alex, James, Jess, Bill and John and beat the heat with a cold beer.

Films Featured On Today's Episode Include:

Lomography Lomochrome Purple XR

Kodak Gold 200

Rollei Retro 80s

Rollei RPX 25

CineStill 400D

Kodak TMax 100

In today's episode, joining James, Bill, and John are two fellow film photographers, podcasters, YouTubers, and generally all-around amazing people, Matt Murray and Lucy Lumen from Australia. The team talks about all things film photographers across two parts of the British Commonwealth.

You can find them if you aren't following Matt and Lucy on Socials.

Matt
Matt Loves Cameras on Apple Podcasts
Instagram @mattlovescameras
YouTube @Matt Loves Cameras

Lucy
Lucy Lumen's Podcast Adventure On Apple Podcasts
Instagram @lucy_lumen
YouTube @Lucy Lumen's Analog Adventures

One thing that always happens is that as a photographer you usually end up with a camera that belonged to a family member, or maybe a family member encouraged you through the gift of a camera and guidance with using it. So in today's episode Alex, John, and Bill each tell a short story about those special cameras that have a family connection.

Cameras Featured In Today's Episode

  • Kodak Pony 135 Model C
  • Kodak Brownie Hawkeye Flash
  • Voigtlander Vito B
  • Yashica TL-Electro
  • Nikon F
  • Leica M3

It's our annual episode where the entire show is taken over by an all-women team! So join Chris and Jess as they host a roundtable with a group of amazing photographers!

After a long delay, we're continuing our drive into the professional model Nikon SLRs. The third version or Nikon F3 came out in 1981 and marked a major shift both in design and internals. The Nikon F3 relied on battery power, went with a sleek new all-black design and had a proper industrial design to back up the change! 

Suppose you've been living under a rock. In that case, the name Lina Bessonova may not be familiar to you, but if you're active on social media and deep in the online film photography community, then the name Lina Bessonova! And today, she sits down with the team at CCR to discuss anything from her favourite camera (the Yashica-D) to her inspirations, favourite film stocks, artistic vision, subjects, and darkroom printing.

You should check out her social media presence!
Instagram: instagram.com/linabessonova.photography
YouTube: youtube.com/c/linabessonova

In this episode, we're talking all things medium format while poking a little fun at the widespread misinterpretation of 120 film as "120mm film." We're tackling everything from cameras to negative sizes and even lenses aimed at the popular format that has been around for over 100 years now and isn't going away anytime soon. Especially with Kodak Gold 200 in 120 format and CineStill trying to bring back 220 film! In full disclosure, 120mm film did exist, but it's more closely tied to a large format as 120mm is 12cm which is about 4.5 inches. Surprisingly some films have the 120mm measurement; there are 1898’s 113 (90×120mm) and 114 (120x90mm) formats. If you're already seeing something and that these roll films are all numerical formats, with the first roll film released in 1881 being 101, going all the way to 119, which means that 120 film were first released in 1901 following the sequence already laid out.

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